Native American from the Mohican tribe. Writer, Peer Specialist, YouTube Partner.

Posts tagged ‘Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages’

Mahican Beadwork at the National Museum of the American Indian Cultural Resource Center

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Wenona Morning Star Gardner of the Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation uncovering Mahican beadwork at the National Museum of American Indian Cultural Resource Center in Suitland, Maryland  

 

As part on my Breath of Life Archival Institute of Indigenous Languages experience, I had the privilege to visit the National Museum of American Indian Cultural Resource Center (CRC) in Suitland, Maryland. The CRC, is home to the extensive collections and research programs of the museum. While at the CRC, I uncovered Mahican and Munsee baskets, bowls, mortar and pestles, as well as beadwork. As a beader myself, I am especially fond of beadwork so in this post I wanted to highlight some of the photos of my favorite Mahican beadwork that I had the chance to see. 

I learned from L. Frank Manriquez that the purpose of surrounding ourselves with the original items of our people like our beadwork is because it helps with connecting to our native language. Since our old items and beadwork contain the memory of our language, if we were able to hold them you can feel that memory of our language of our people. 

 

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Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

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Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

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Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

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Mahican beadwork. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

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Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

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Mahican beadwork from the 1940s. Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 2013. Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

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Cultural Resources Center, National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution, 4220 Silver Hill Road, Suitland, Maryland 20746. (2013) Photo by Wenona Morning Star Gardner (Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation).

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Sacred Journey with Owl

NMAI OWLS

Owls created from various tribes at the National Museum of American Indian in Washington DC

On June 7, 2013 I left for a 2 week trip for the Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages in Washington DC. While in DC, I searched the Library of Congress and Smithsonian Institute Archives searching for the Mahican and Munsee languages of my Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation. While I was riding on the train from Chicago to DC, I spotted an owl in broad daylight flying over a children’s playground in Chicago. I took that as a very important sign from the Creator.

At the National American Indian Museum I wheeled past in my wheel chair and randomly noticed a display of Owls made from various tribes. A couple days later while in my wheel chair, I was rolling through the National Museum of Natural History just quickly passing through by random chance I encountered another display of Owls without even trying to look for them. In my research at the National Anthropological Archives in Maryland I discovered a Mahican story in Mahican called The Owl Story. This is the original version of The Owl Story August 4, 1914 and was in Linguist Truman Michelson’s papers of a story told in English by Mohican Sot Quinney and then is translated into Mahican by Mohican William Dick which is the most accurate version of the story. I felt extremely honored to touch Michelson’s original papers handwritten in Mahican. According to Breath of Life Eastern Algonquian Linguist Conor Quinn who spoke to Linguist and Algonquian Language Specialist Ives Goddard, Quinney and Dick worked cooperatively on The Owl Story plus the six other Mahican stories I uncovered and both deserve credit. Within The Owl Story I learned the Mahican word for owl which is Mcō’ksasan.

Owl display at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC

Owl display at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC

According to the National Museum of American Indian This Day in the Mayan calendar http://blog.nmai.si.edu/main/2013/06/this-day-in-the-maya-calendar-summer-13.html , I learned corresponding with “June 25, 2013, is 8 Kame. Kame is the Owl and the recognition of death; 8 is a double balance. A day that recalls the night, tranquility, and silence, Kame is a good day to ask for the ancient and recent ancestors who have gone on, to thank them and remember them with purpose. Without fear, it is a good day to approach the spiritual dimension, ‘the enchantment.’”

Personally, I have associated the Owl representing the keeper of hidden knowledge and it seems most fitting to me as I explored the National Anthropological Archives in Maryland. I associate Owls with wisdom and spirituality which I perceive my Breath of Life journey to be focused on. I spent from February to June preparing myself spiritually with regular prayers and ceremony for the healing journey of Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages. I even invited my community to pray with me as I included them in a Breath of Life Prayer Circle. As I shared my research with my online tribal group Mohican-8 https://www.facebook.com/groups/Mohican7 I attempted to make Breath of Life a community project so that they too were part of the process of uncovering hidden knowledge about our Mohican people. Owl also indicated to me the connection to our ancestors and I felt that as I touched the old papers in the archives that were handwritten with Mahican words.

I have been surrounded by Owl medicine during and after my Breath of Life journey. I am blessed to be in touch with the spirit world and by searching the archives to discover hidden knowledge. I am grateful the Owl has come with me on this sacred journey. I feel blessed.

Anushiik,

Wenona Morning Star Gardner

Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation

 

All Night Ceremony

I remember when I was growing up my native mother Hail Eagle Woman would stay up all night talking about ceremonies with me.

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Time used to fly by as we discussed spirituality and ritual. I miss those days. Tonight, I feel like I am relieving those days but tonight I am “talking” using my fingers. I talk with loved ones through emails and instant message. I blog and tweet by experiences and stories emerging from my Breath of Life Adventure. The best thing tonight was reading everybody’s prayers for me and my quest. I definitely feel the sacredness of my journey especially tonight. I began this journey with tobacco prayers. I surrounded myself with daily prayers with Rainbow Turtle and healing native music. I really do believe that tonight is a turning point and a new spiritual chapter is opening up to me. This blessing is a wonderful early birthday present. Anushiik Thank you for praying with me on this sacred night.

The Breath of Life Prayer Circle.

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The Breath of Life Prayer Circle

I am coming to you asking for prayer support as I go on my journey to the Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages in Washington DC. I will be searching the archives of the Library of Congress and Smithsonian Institute searching for Mahican and Munsee languages from my tribe. I will be going to Washington DC June 7-June 22, 2013. I am requesting that you regularly provide your prayers both before, during, and after my trip. I need prayers before I go to get ready for my journey. I definitely need prayers as I am actually traveling during June 7- June 22 since I am physically disabled and traveling poses special challenges for me. I will need prayers to help me locate and find hidden knowledge in the archives. I also need prayers to help me retrieve the information and bring it safely back to my tribe the Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation and the rest of the Lenape Nations. Most importantly I need prayers so that the information I get can be implemented and properly put into use. 

Prayers that can be shared so that I can see them when I am in Washington DC would be much appreciated. I would like to see prayers written, pictures created, video of songs or music playing posted so I can view and hear them while I am on the road. I appreciate if you chose to pray silently and I am grateful for that. However, I am especially asking for prayers that I can see and hear while I am actually in Washington DC. Please post your prayers so I can be inspired and lifted as I take on the challenge of this intense two weeks. 

I am grateful for you being part of my Breath of Life Prayer Circle. I am grateful for all and any prayers. I look forward to see what prayers you have to share. 

Anushiik Thank you!

Wenona Morning Star Gardner
Stockbridge-Munsee band of Mohican Nation

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VIDEO: Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages

Host: Wenona Morning Star Gardner enrolled in the Stockbridge Munsee-Band of Mohican Nation. Member of the Eastern Algonquian Team of Breath of Life Archival Institute of Indigenous Languages.

Guests: Fellow members of the Eastern Algonquian Team of Breath of Life Archival Institute of Indigenous Languages

David White (Nipmuck)
Dr. Conor Quinn (Linguist)
Matt Magnuson (Linguist)

Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages Google+ Hangout

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Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages Google+ Hangout

Wed May 15 at 6:00 pm CDT

Location: http://gplus.to/azurebreezes

Host: Wenona Morning Star Gardner enrolled in the Stockbridge Munsee-Band of Mohican Nation. Member of the Eastern Algonquian Team of Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages.

Guests: Fellow members of the Eastern Algonquian Team of Breath of Life Archival Institute for Indigenous Languages

David White (Nipmuck)
Dr. Conor Quinn (Linguist)
Matt Magnuson (Linguist)

Mohican News

I was pleased to discover that Mohican News ran an article about our Breath of Life Archival Institute of Indigenous Languages project. An invitation was made to anyone that wants to participate in the Breath of Life by coming to Mohican-8 to be part of this community project.
Mohican-8 on Facebook is at https://www.facebook.com/groups/Mohican7
The article is in Mohican News May 1, 2013 Page 5

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